Google+ When I travel with my DJI Phantom, I usually use a Nanuk 940... - Drones HomeDrones Home

When I travel with my DJI Phantom, I usually use a Nanuk 940…

March 29, 2014 - Comment

Hosted at: http://skypixel.org/post/81054182881

I’ve also lashed my Phantom to the outside of a backpack, which works pretty well for hiking, but leaves the Phantom and gimbal exposed to the elements.

Today, I tried something different. I packed a Phantom into a Think Tank Airport Acceleration backpack (the current version is the Airport Accelerator Backpack), which is the pack I normally use when I travel for underwater photography. The entire insides of the backpack can be removed and reconfigured, which makes it perfect for holding large things like quadcopters. I configured the large divider panels so they hug the contours of the Phantom, giving me plenty of space to put in the radio, which has a Black Pearl diversity receiver monitor attached to it via a Rave Aerial Video 3D-printed monitor mount (the best one, in my opinion). I also can fit a bunch of extra batteries (or two Phantom 2 battery chargers, as shown in the pictures), and a bunch of other accessories. The separate computer bag (integrated, in the new version of the backpack) can be used to hold a computer and/or iPad, etc.

The backpack is pretty bulky, but it is a lot easier to carry around than a hard case!

I know of a couple dedicated Phantom backpacks being developed right now by third parties, so it looks like there will be some off-the-shelf options soon.

Hosted at: http://skypixel.org/post/81054182881

I’ve also lashed my Phantom to the outside of a backpack, which works pretty well for hiking, but leaves the Phantom and gimbal exposed to the elements.

Today, I tried something different. I packed a Phantom into a Think Tank Airport Acceleration backpack (the current version is the Airport Accelerator Backpack), which is the pack I normally use when I travel for underwater photography. The entire insides of the backpack can be removed and reconfigured, which makes it perfect for holding large things like quadcopters. I configured the large divider panels so they hug the contours of the Phantom, giving me plenty of space to put in the radio, which has a Black Pearl diversity receiver monitor attached to it via a Rave Aerial Video 3D-printed monitor mount (the best one, in my opinion). I also can fit a bunch of extra batteries (or two Phantom 2 battery chargers, as shown in the pictures), and a bunch of other accessories. The separate computer bag (integrated, in the new version of the backpack) can be used to hold a computer and/or iPad, etc.

The backpack is pretty bulky, but it is a lot easier to carry around than a hard case!

I know of a couple dedicated Phantom backpacks being developed right now by third parties, so it looks like there will be some off-the-shelf options soon.

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